Comments on: Using Wikipedia to Highlight Digital Collections at the University of Washington http://interactivearchivist.archivists.org Case Studies in Utilizing Web 2.0 to Improve the Archival Experience. Tue, 04 May 2010 21:58:12 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.1.2 By: David Goodman http://interactivearchivist.archivists.org/case-studies/wikipedia-at-uw/#comment-270 David Goodman Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:49:43 +0000 http://lib.byu.edu/sites/interactivearchivist/?page_id=95#comment-270 I'm a former librarian now active primarily on Wikipedia as an administrator. I have dealt with a number of cases of these large scale link additions by libraries, publishers, and other organizations, most well-intentioned, but often disruptive. There is an explicit discussion of these concerns on one of the Wikipedia talk pages: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Spam/2007_Archive_Jul#Library_links_discussions I wonder whether you had any discussions with any of the people here before starting? I am, frankly, concerned that other people will not be as careful, and that projects like this will diminish the credibility of what librarians are trying to accomplish at Wikipedia. Myself, as a former librarian now an administrator at Wikipedia, I have devoted only a very small amount of my attention to my own university. Dirk's eventual page to which your refer is a very good one, but at this point it represents his personal view only--though as for myself I endorse it. Wikipedia has almost no fixed policies in the sense that most organizations do. All its rules are constructed by a variety of chaotic processes from the consensus of the people who choose to participate at Wikipedia--so everything about it is subject to frequent change. No group or individual can speak for Wikipedia except the Wikimedia Foundation's Board of Directors or Attorney--and they do not concern themselves with the content policies of the various language Wikipedias, except for such obvious legal concerns as legal threats, libel, the treatment of living people, and respect for copyright. In addition the the references you list, I can suggest: a/ http://howwikipediaworks.com/ , the free online version] of ''How Wikipedia Works'' by Phoebe Ayers, Charles Matthews, and Ben Yates (also available in print from http://nostarch.com/howwikiworks.htm) -- Phoebe is a fellow librarian b/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:The_Missing_Manual , the free online version of "Wikipedia: The Missing Manual" by John Broughton (also available in print at http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596515164/) c/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:FAQ/Schools -- our FAQ page about Schools and school projects moo I’m a former librarian now active primarily on Wikipedia as an administrator. I have dealt with a number of cases of these large scale link additions by libraries, publishers, and other organizations, most well-intentioned, but often disruptive.

There is an explicit discussion of these concerns on one of the Wikipedia talk pages: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Spam/2007_Archive_Jul#Library_links_discussions

I wonder whether you had any discussions with any of the people here before starting? I am, frankly, concerned that other people will not be as careful, and that projects like this will diminish the credibility of what librarians are trying to accomplish at Wikipedia. Myself, as a former librarian now an administrator at Wikipedia, I have devoted only a very small amount of my attention to my own university. Dirk’s eventual page to which your refer is a very good one, but at this point it represents his personal view only–though as for myself I endorse it.

Wikipedia has almost no fixed policies in the sense that most organizations do. All its rules are constructed by a variety of chaotic processes from the consensus of the people who choose to participate at Wikipedia–so everything about it is subject to frequent change. No group or individual can speak for Wikipedia except the Wikimedia Foundation’s Board of Directors or Attorney–and they do not concern themselves with the content policies of the various language Wikipedias, except for such obvious legal concerns as legal threats, libel, the treatment of living people, and respect for copyright.

In addition the the references you list, I can suggest:
a/ http://howwikipediaworks.com/ , the free online version] of ”How Wikipedia Works” by Phoebe Ayers, Charles Matthews, and Ben Yates (also available in print from http://nostarch.com/howwikiworks.htm) — Phoebe is a fellow librarian
b/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:The_Missing_Manual , the free online version of “Wikipedia: The Missing Manual” by John Broughton (also available in print at http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596515164/)
c/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:FAQ/Schools — our FAQ page about Schools and school projects

moo

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